Food, Glorious Food

I am attending three courses this semester, two for a grade and one as an auditor, and there is no commonality that stretches across the three…except food.

All of my professors have set up a system to ensure that, in the middle of the three hour class, there is a snack break and someone is responsible for bringing the snacks. Snacks is a…relative term. Today, for example, one of my professors provided us with tea in individual mugs, fresh bread, feta, artichoke and olive salad and mixed nuts.

I had tea. (For those who don’t know, by the way, plain black tea, plain green tea and Earl Grey do not require kosher supervision.) I tried not to drool over the feta. I had some more tea and a granola bar I had in my bag and tried not to sulk. Then I tried not to sniffle too loudly during class, because I have this cold that seems to be making its vicious way around my family. But there’s really not that much to do about it other than take the medicine, suck it up and try not to sneeze. Oh, and bring tissues to class! The good lord invented those little kleenex packs for a reason and I promise you I will not be forgetting to put one in my knapsack ever again.

Class was eventually over and I could blow my nose as loudly as I wanted and go home to my refrigerator and cut myself a lovely piece of Trader Joe’s kosher feta and then all was right with the world. At least until I had to sneeze again.

Part of me wonders how long it will take until people notice I don’t eat food unless it’s my own. Or fruit. Or has a visible kosher symbol. I decided not to point it out because there’s nothing anyone can do. When others mention that they are vegetarians/vegans/allergic to peanuts, it’s so that the person responsible for preparing the food can take them into account and prepare something they can eat. If I told people I kept kosher, they’d ask what I can eat.

“Well, food cooked in a kosher kitchen or food with an acceptable kosher symbol on it.” is the short answer and the long answer would involve a handout with the kosher symbols one is likely to find around here, plus a short discourse on why they wouldn’t be able to turn their kitchens kosher for me. So I’ve found it saves everyone trouble if I just don’t say anything. More to the point, saves people feeling guilty that they can’t make something I can eat.

Of course, there’s always the week I get to bring the food and then I’ll be able to eat to my heart’s content. I’m thinking muffins.

Advertisements
About

I'm a doctoral student in English Literature at the University of California, Santa Barbara. My interests lie in the field known very broadly as the Digital Humanities and I focus on reading digital books (what happens to books as they become not merely digitized, but digital) and reading books digitally (how can we use computers to learn new things about literature). In what spare time I have, I read speculative fiction, transform long strings of yarn into apparel and decor and play with my friends' dogs while eagerly awaiting the day when we move to an apartment complex that will allow us to have one.

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Uncategorized
4 comments on “Food, Glorious Food
  1. Erachet says:

    I hear ya, sister! I’ve been going through the same thing at Bank Street. It got really awkward when, at the end of last semester, my tight-knit conference group decided to have a pot-luck dinner at someone’s apartment as an end of semester celebration. I, of course, could not eat anything except what I brought, and I had to explain that what I brought had to stay in the container I brought it in, and that I brought my own utensils, too. And I could not join them in wine drinking. I felt so awkward.

    • Aunto Barbo says:

      Lizzy, I am captivated by the sequence of events surrounding your daily activities. Your command of the language and story telling, yes story telling, is so interesting that I cannot stop reading until I get to the end. As my siblings may know, I am not a reader; subconsciously, I think it’s a waste of time, when I could be installing a ceiling fan. Yes, I know, how terrible to admit to that. However, it seems to me if you ever decide to write professionally, I might set aside the electrical wiring; the plumbing and the carpentry to sit on my deck and lazily read your stories. Love ya much…keep the blog going.

  2. Phyllis L says:

    Living between Smithfield (ham) and the Chesapeake Bay (blue crabs), I often come to a pot luck where I can only eat what I bring. I’m sure your muffins will be delicious, but the others won’t realize they’re kosher. It might help if you also bring something that you would eat if someone else brought it, like fresh fruit. Eventually the group will get a connection that this is something you’ll eat and they’ll include that in their offerings.

  3. You should totally make those doughnut muffin cupcake things. SO MUCH LOVE FOR THOSE.

    Also I have a new chapter of Leopard for you! 😀

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: