I Blog Therefore I Am Doing Something

There’s not much to report on the visualization front this week. I have created a couple of elementary (actually, closer to Kindergarten) graphs in R by following the instructions in Matthew Jockers’ excellent book, Text Analysis with R for Students of Literature, which is currently in draft form, but an excellent resource nonetheless. So I have learned some things about the relative frequencies of the words “whale” and “Ahab” and, more importantly, I’m gaining some insight into what else I could do with my newfound knowledge of statistical programming. But my studies in R are still very much at the learning stage and I have yet to reach a point where I can imagine using it in a more playful, exploratory sense. While this is not true of every tool, R is one of the ones that must be mastered before it can be misused in an interesting manner. Which is not to say that it cannot be used badly – I am getting good at that – but the difference between using a tool badly and playfully is a critical distinction. A playful framework is one that eschews the tool’s obvious purpose in order to see what else it can produce; a framework that validates a kind of “What the hell, why not?” approach to analysis. Playfulness exists when we search for new ways to analyze old data and disconcerting methods for presenting it. It can be found in the choice to showcase one’s work as a large-scale three dimensional art-project and in the decision to bring the history of two Wikipedia articles about the author into one’s examination of the text. It is not, more’s the pity, found in code that fails to execute.*

All this adds up to an apology: I have no intriguing word clouds for you this week. I don’t even have any less-than-intriguing word clouds this week. But I do have some thoughts about the nature of this blogging endeavor, nearly a year and a half after it was started.

This blog began as a way to record our visualization experiments in a forum where we could treat them as part of a larger group and where we would be forced to engage with them publicly. It was a way to hold ourselves accountable to our professor, to each other and to ourselves. At the same time, it was a way to provide all our visualizations (even the ones that did not make it into our final seminar papers) with a home and a life beyond our hard drives and walls.

The class has ended and the blog lives on. Last year, it was a place for me to think through a social-network graph of William Faulkner’s Light in August; a project that grew out of the work I did on Daniel Deronda. This year, it’s serving as a repository for experiments that I perform as part of my work in UCSB’s Transcriptions Center.

And throughout those different iterations, one element of common purpose stands out to me. The blog is a place for scholarly work-in-progress. It’s where projects that need an audience, but are not meant for traditional publication can go. It’s where projects that have reached a dead end in my mind and require a new perspective can be aired for public consumption. It is, at its most basic level, a way of saying “This work that I am in the process of doing is meaningful”.

And that, I think, is the real key to why I find maintaining this blog – despite my sporadic updating during my exam year – so valuable. Blogging about my work gives me a reason to do it. This might sound absurd, if not simplistic, but bear with me for a moment. Academia is a goal-oriented endeavor. We begin with the understanding that we finish our readings on time in order to have meaningful conversation about them in order do well in a course. We do our own research in order to write a paper about it in order, once again, to do well in a course or in order to present it at a conference. (Obviously, I’m not arguing that the only reason that anyone reads anything is for a grade, but the fact that graduate students turn said research into a well-argued paper within a reasonable time-frame is tied to the power of the grade.)  The books we read, the programs we learn, the courses we teach are oriented towards the dual goals of spreading knowledge in the classroom and publishing knowledge in the form of an article or monograph.

So where does practical knowledge within the digital humanities fit in? In the goal-oriented culture of academia, where is the value in learning a program before you have a concrete idea of what you will use it for? Why learn R without a specific project in mind? Why topic model a collection of books if you’re not really interested in producing knowledge from that form of macroanalysis? My experience with academia has not really encouraged a “for the hell of it” attitude and yet a number of the tools used specifically within the digital humanities require one to invest time and practice before discovering the ways in which they might be useful.

There are several answers to the above question. One that is used to great effect in this department and that is becoming more popular in other Universities as well is the Digital Humanities course. I am thinking in particular of Alan Liu’s Literature+ course, the seminar for which this blog was originally created. By placing digital training within the framework of a quasi-traditional class, we as students are introduced to and taught to deploy digital forms of scholarship in the same manner that we learn other forms of scholarly practice. If we master close-reading in the classroom, we should master distant reading in it as well.

And yet, what does one do when the class is over? Styles of human reading are consistently welcome in graduate seminars in a way that machinic readings are not. And there are only so many times one can take the same class over and over again, even assuming that one’s institution even offers a class like Literature+.

The alternative is to take advantage of blogging as a content-production platform. The blog takes over as the goal towards which digital training is oriented. Which is a very long way of saying that I blog so that I have something to do with my digital experiments and I perform digital experiments so that I have something to blog about. Which seems like circular logic (because it is), but the decision to make blogging an achievement like, albeit not on the same level as, producing a conference paper is one that allows me, once again, to hold myself accountable for producing work and results.

This year, “Ludic Analytics” will be my own little Literature+ class, a place where I record my experiments in order to invest them with a kind of intellectual meaning and sense of achievement. Learning to count incidences of “Ahab” and “Whale” in Moby Dick may not be much, but just wait until next week when I start counting mentions of “Gwendolen” and “Deronda”…

*I apologize for the slight bitterness, I spend half an hour today combing through some really simple code trying to find the one mistake. There was a “1” instead of an “i” near the top.

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About

I'm a doctoral student in English Literature at the University of California, Santa Barbara. My interests lie in the field known very broadly as the Digital Humanities and I focus on reading digital books (what happens to books as they become not merely digitized, but digital) and reading books digitally (how can we use computers to learn new things about literature). In what spare time I have, I read speculative fiction, transform long strings of yarn into apparel and decor and play with my friends' dogs while eagerly awaiting the day when we move to an apartment complex that will allow us to have one.

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2 comments on “I Blog Therefore I Am Doing Something
  1. […] I Blog Therefore I Am…Doing Something […]

  2. […] I Blog Therefore I Am…Doing Something […]

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